Deming in Japan in Post-war Years

This comment is about the US quality control specialist, Deming, who went to Japan about 1950 and was a significant factor in changing Japan’s production from that of inexpensive items to world competitive items. The post is one of what were to be 3 to Tunisia-live.[move up a few lines to view the whole article]

http://www.tunisia-live.net/2014/01/03/what-tunisia-can-learn-from-postwar-japan/

Here is a fact about Japan, regarding jobs and products produced.

There was a person named Deming who came over to Japan from the United States. Businesses and companies in the US would not listen to Deming’s ideas about something called “quality control,” or alternately called “quality improvement.” Somehow he came to Japan in the years about 1950 to ?1960’s or 70’s  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._Edwards_Deming . WWII ended 1945.

Before Deming came to Japan, Japanese products were known the world over, or at least in the US, as “cheap junk,” tiny type stuff, inexpensive, sort of “junk” type items, and from Japan, very cheap.

Unlike the people in the US, the Japanese listened seriously to Deming. I guess most of the time he was giving presentations to companies. That was the beginning of Japan starting to get a reputation for something other than cheap junk.

Over the years, the products from Japan changed from cheap junk to high quality cars and electronics, sold all over the world, eventually of a quality higher than the West. In our current times, the Japanese reputation for quality has slipped down a little from what it was, because the companies in other countries realized they had better work to catch up to the quality of Japanese products.

These are some facts – related to the history of Japanese goods sold in the world. Deming’s work certainly increased the number of jobs in Japan, and over time, it increased the salary of those jobs, issues that are of great importance to some Tunisians, as I see from articles on the internet about the sad self-immolations a few years ago and recently. This is how I started to read about Tunisia, and about what came to be called the “Arab Spring,” all through articles on the internet.

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